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Benefits of Suppressors

Benefits of Suppressors

THE NRA POSITION
NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action (NRA-ILA) champions the use of suppressors because of the clear benefits they provide. Most recently, NRA-ILA worked to pass legislation legalizing them in IOWA, making the Hawkeye State No. 42 to permit their ownership. Suppressors are currently legal for hunting in 40 states.

  • Suppressors decrease muzzle report and reduce the risk of hearing damage that can occur when discharging a firearm without hearing protection.

  • Suppressors increase shooting accuracy by reducing felt recoil and shot “flinch.”

  • Suppressors reduce noise complaints from neighbors, which are frequently used as an excuse to close hunting and shooting areas.

FACTS FROM THE AMERICAN SUPPRESSOR ASSOCIATION
Take it from the American Suppressor Association, which covers the following four points on its Education Page.

Hearing Protection: Noise-induced hearing loss and tinnitus, or ringing in the ears, are common afflictions for hunters and recreational shooters. Suppressors reduce the noise of a gunshot by an average of 20-35 dB—roughly the same amount as ear plugs or muffs—preserving the hearing of recreational shooters, hunters and hunting dogs.

Hunter Safety: While many hunters do not wear hearing protection in the field, suppressors permit hunters to maintain full situational awareness while enjoying a safer hunting experience.

Noise Complaints: As urban communities expand into rural areas, shooting ranges and hunting preserves across the country are being closed due to noise complaints. Suppressors diminish the noise.

Accuracy: One of the most common problems shooters face is decreased accuracy due to anticipating felt recoil. By dissipating pressure and gas at the muzzle, suppressors reduce recoil and aid shot placement.

MYTHS ABOUT SUPPRESSORS
Because suppressors have been regulated and priced out of the average American’s means since 1934 (the required federal $200 tax stamp on a 3.50 Maxim silencer equated to $3,500 in 1934 dollars), many folks misunderstand both the laws associated with owning one. Click here for more information on several common myths — and corresponding truths — about suppressor ownership.

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